MotoGP Austria: Yamaha bosses issue public apology - Bikesport News

MotoGP Austria: Yamaha bosses issue public apology

Yamaha bosses have issued a public apology to their two factory riders Maverick Vinales and Valentino Rossi after failing to address issues forcing them to qualifying in eleventh and fourteenth positions respectively during this afternoons MotoGP qualifying session at the Red Bull Ring.

Yamaha MotoGP project leader Kouji Tsuya addressed the media before the rider debriefs apologising for the current state of the M1.

“We have to apologise to riders because of less performance and acceleration performance right now. Today it was very difficult day for us,” said Tsuya.

“This track, we know is difficult for us. We couldn’t achieve to make it just right the power delivery for riders. So that is why it was maybe the worst qualifying result for us. Also Maverick, today, and also on Friday we have some sensor problem, means technical problem on our bike.

“We face free practice one, and free practice four again so we destroyed Maverick’s concentration too much. So now seriously we are investigating how we can solve this problem for tomorrow, but I just want to say sorry to riders, not to concentrate to go faster to qualify better result.”

After this weekend Yamaha have two private tests in Misano and Aragon either side of the British Grand Prix at Silverstone in two weeks time.

“After this race we have a test in Misano before Silverstone and also after Silverstone we have the test in Aragon as well to find the solution to these difficulties,” he said.

Team manager Massimo Meregalli also offered his apologies to his two riders and said Yamaha will keep fighting to fix all the issues they have.

“It’s been a very dark weekend for us so far and we acknowledge our responsibility for not being able to provide the riders with a package that enables them to fight at the top, where they both deserve to be,” said Meregalli.

“But we will continue to fight as a team, so together we can overcome the struggles and the technical issues that have held us back so far.”

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