MotoGP Silverstone: Lowes ‘caught out, gutted, and in pain’

| | MotoGP
Picture: GeeBee Images

Marc VDS’ Sam Lowes had his dream of a successful Moto2 British Grand Prix ended before it had even started at Silverstone on Friday.

His second flying lap of the morning practice on cold tyres saw Lowes launched over his Kalex machine with the 31-year-old landing heavily on his left shoulder resulting in a painful dislocation.

While circuit medics were able to manipulate the shoulder back into position, Lowes was left in a lot of pain and with further analysis needed to understand the extent of his injuries. The remainder of the weekend no longer an option, despite the strong support on show trackside for ‘Team22’.

“Honestly it’s just obviously a nightmare situation for the home race, after five weeks off,” Lowes told bikesportnews.com on Friday evening. “Real strange, second lap and weren’t ready for it, sort of caught me out a little bit, cold tyre and it just caught me out on the kerb.

“They’re the worst crashes. When you’re on a qualifying lap and you’re pushing and you go into the corner and you know you’re on the limit and it could go down, you’re sort of half ready for it. Bit more speed, you slide and you’re alright. The slower ones, you sort of go a bit more up and down and hit the ground and maybe you’re not quite ready for them. So yeah, real unfortunate.

“It’s a shame,” he continued. “Obviously gutted to not be racing this British Grand Prix, to let myself down a little bit, let the fans down. I just have to try and get right now as soon as possible and finish the season best we can.

“I’m gonna see the specialist tomorrow in Manchester get some more information and then see from there if I need surgery or not,” he said of his so far unknown prognosis, which could hamper his return to action at Austria in a fortnight’s time. “It will all depend on what they say, the next steps. Obviously now it feels real sore but it’s four hours/five hours ago. My shoulder was out, is not normal that it comes out, so wait and see, see if there’s any fractures - well there is but see how bad they are, check the ligaments and tendons and then go from there.”